Sweet Tea & Shopping

Make plans now to join us for Sweet Tea & Shopping 2016 Fall Frenzy at the Sumner County Fairgrounds (Gallatin,TN) for a weekend of shopping, food, music & fun on September 16 & 17!

An unparalleled assortment of handmade, homemade & original creations, vintage & antique treasures, original art, home decor, gifts, funky junk, entrepreneurs, along with irresistable rescued, restored & repurposed Items – Small to Large, local photography, jewelry, apparel & more! All Presented In The Most Appealing Of Boutique Styles!

Delightfully styled spaces and areas filled with the designs of so many talented folks, provide shopping guests a one-of-a-kind experience and opportunity to explore and delight in a plethora of original art, repurposed cast-offs, antique, vintage & collectible treasures, alongside a wide variety of handcrafted goods and designs.

In Addition To A Great Weekend Of Shopping, You Will Find A Wide Range Of Entertainment, Food Trucks, Skills Demos, Informational Spaces & Interactive Children’s Activities!

Sweet Tea & Shopping Continues to Grow & Expand – Come Be A Part Of 2016 Fall Frenzy!

– Bring the children – Children’s Activities Will Be Available All Day Saturday.

— Everyone will enjoy the live on -stage entertainment provided by local & middle Tennessee favorites.

–Food Trucks and Mobile Eateries are sure to tempt your taste buds and please the most discerning of palettes!

The options, variety & fun are too many to mention – This semi-annual event known for incredible shopping, family-friendly atmosphere, and homespun fun has returned to the heart of Gallatin, TN, just one block off Nashville Pike/Gallatin Road… Mark your calendar & plan now to be part of the fun!

Sweet Tea & Shopping 2016 Fall Frenzy…

PREVIEW PARTY (Open to public)
**Friday, September 16, 2016 (4pm to 8pm)**$8.00**
—–First 300 shopping guest receive a SWEET TEA & SHOPPING GIFT
—– Access to Exclusive Friday Night specials, discounts, giveaways & more
—–Friday ticket is valid for re-entry on Saturday, April 16, 2016

**GENERAL ADMISSION (Open to public)
**Saturday, September 17, 2016 (9am to 5pm)**$5.00**

10 & UNDER FREE BOTH DAYS
****Open to the Public Both Days****

Sumner County Fairgrounds
222 Fairgrounds Road
Gallatin, TN 37066

Tickets upon arrival at the entry gate or by advance purchase at… www.sweetteaandshopping.com

Sweetteandshopping.com

What makes Nashville a place people want to live?

I read a stat that Nashville grows by 80 people a day. Of all the stats I read on a daily basis, this one stuck with me—Chicago only grew by 82 people in all of last year!

The Nashville region is expected to grow by almost 40 percent over the next 15 years, adding roughly 500,000 people. Cranes are everywhere in Nashville, and with few reliable transit options, so are cars.

So what makes Nashville a place people want to live?

I went to Nashville, talked to local leaders, dined in its hip new restaurants, ate delicious popsicles and spent lots of time in Uber to find out what makes Nashville so great.

The first thing I noticed about Nashville was cranes. They are everywhere. More than 100 new projects—$2 billion in development—are being constructed in Nashville. I counted six in a few-block area of the Gulch neighborhood, adjacent to downtown Nashville and Music Row, alone. The second most noticeable thing about Nashville? Cars. There are almost no transportation options other than driving.

Overall my research points to seven reasons Nashville has nbecome so popular, but also cautions that sustainability is a real concern and could stymie future growth.

Reasons Nashville is growing
1. Low cost of living
2. Families
3. Less stress
4. Jobs
5. Government efficiency
6. Planning
7. Culture

Issues it must address: Transportation and Affordable Housing

What makes Nashville an attractive place?

1. Low cost of living
A cost of living comparison offers the first glimpse of why Nashville is an attractive option for people. Housing is less expensive in Nashville. Add to that the fact that annual expenses for a family of four are roughly $15,000 cheaper. And Tennessee’s per capita taxes are some of the lowest in the country. With no state income tax, combined state and local per capita tax burden is only $2,777 in Tennessee.

2. It’s good for families
Between 2009 and 2014 Nashville grew by 41,000 people or about 17,000 households.

3. Stress—less of it

Also on par with the low cost of living that makes Nashville an attractive place is a few phrases that kept coming up in my conversations—Nashville “is easy” or “simple” and “a less stressful place to live.” In a comparison of the most stressed-out cities, Nashville is 33rd. While sitting at Barista Parlor Golden Sound, a coffee house located in an old recording studio in the Gulch neighborhood, I overheard a conversation that sums up that sentiment. A woman in her 20’s was visiting from New York City and talking on the phone about a potential move to Nashville. Her reason? I can work anywhere, why am I killing myself trying to pay rent in NYC when there are cool things in Nashville and it’s so much cheaper? She went on to say “I don’t have a desire to leave New York, I have a desire to not have a heart attack by the time I’m 30.” And the clincher: “I have another friend moving here from San Francisco and can rent a beautiful one-bedroom loft overlooking downtown Nashville and be less stressed.”

4. Jobs
Named one of Gallop’s top five cities for job growth, over the past decade Nashville grew nine times more jobs than Chicago as a percent of total jobs. Taxes and the regulatory environment could play a role in that growth—Tennessee’s corporate income tax rate is 6.5 percent, compared to Illinois’ combined 9.5 percent. Tennessee’s business tax climate is ranked 15th. There’s also no personal income tax.

5. Government Efficiency
With no state income tax, combined state and local per capita tax burden is only $2,777 in Tennessee compared to $4,658 in Illinois.

A universal theme I heard attributed to Nashville’s growth is that the city “removes hurdles to make it happen.” One of these hurdles is layers of government. Businesses have said they located in Nashville because there were less layers of government to deal with in the region and, whether or not the reality, Nashville was perceived as an easier place to do business. For example, a call center was awarded a building permit in one day.

The city of Nashville and Davidson County have one, consolidated government, Metro. Assessment of that shift found the consolidated government did improve efficiency and slowed down the increase in government expenditures per capita, suggesting that the metropolitan government was doing more with its resources. Surveys of residents found that people were very satisfied with the consolidation.

6. Planning

Nashville’s Belmont neighborhood: A Nashville Next plan goal is to make Nashville more walkable and less car dependent.

Nashville recently adopted Nashville Next, a comprehensive plan that will guide the city’s growth for the next 25 years. Adopted on June 22, 2015, after three years of community engagement involving more than 18,500 participants, The plan is “…a strategy for what the city should do. Where to build homes — and what kind. How to improve transportation. And the best ways to spend city tax dollars.” There is an overall consensus on focused development downtown. The plan’s four strategies are:

1. Create more walkable centers
2. Create opportunity through abundant housing
3. Build a high-capacity transit system and
4. Increase the community’s resiliency

In creating the four strategies, planners considered changes in demographic trends, poverty and environment, and aligned those trends with the plan’s goals. For example, Nashville will have an older population with the aging of the Baby Boomer generation and a younger Millennial generation, both of whom will want smaller, attached homes rather than homes on large single-family lots. Further, demographic trends “…point toward a future where demand for walkable neighborhoods outstrips the supply…”

Nashville Next has a preferred future shaped by six factors:

1. Protection of sensitive environmental features
2. A complete transit network
3. Household affordability across income levels
4. Focus on activity centers—places with transportation access, abundant housing and amenities
5. Strategic infill that supports transit lines and activity centers
6. Protection and enhancement of the character of different parts of the county. The plan goals include:

Develop standards that guide the design, location and construction of affordable housing across all neighborhoods.
Target infill development along mobility corridors to provide more housing choices that support walking and transit use and to transition gracefully between residential neighborhoods and more intense mixed use and commercial centers and corridors.
Ensure jobs, education and training opportunities are located close to transit service, in centers or in high-need areas.

Development in Nashville’s Gulch neighborhood.

These goals will guide how the Metro government regulates land use, zoning and other development decisions as well as capital spending through policy maps. The policy maps give geographic guidance for decision-making, such as priorities for transit or new greenways. Progress will be tracked annually.

7. Culture

Nashville has many of those amenities for a mid-size city. Its restaurant scene is, “…growing exponentially” and a new $623 million downtown convention center complex “…is demonstrating that the center of gravity is now moving downtown.” Nashville has Tennessee Preforming Arts Center featuring many Broadway shows, Opera, Museums and MUSIC!

And this may be anecdotal, but more than one person (and many Uber drivers) told me that Nashville’s growth is due to the TV show Nashville, Taylor Swift making country music more mainstream and Jack White.

By Chrissy Mancini Nichols
October 21, 2015
Metroplanning.org

Seller Mistakes

Data provided by ActiveRain.com.

ActiveRain is an online community of real estate professionals who exchange best practices, write real estate blogs, and get free education from the industry and their peers.

The biggest seller mistake is overpricing their home. Regardless of the comparables, their home is “Better”. So it sits on the market until it has to be reduced. Then buyers start asking, “What’s wrong with that house”. READ THE COMPS!

Recently, one of my buyers walked away from purchasing a home because the seller refused to do any repairs. HELLO …..negotiate the repairs!

All of the items on this chart are important….Sellers take note!

IT’S THE PRICE THAT SELLS A HOME

Location affects the value of a home, but it’s price that sells a home.

Oceanfront, mountainside, or penthouse, the most desirable location in the world won’t sell at the wrong price.

Every property has a potential buyer, but like rock, paper, scissors, it’s sometimes hard to know which factor is going to win the showdown.

A good location will sell at a fair price. A bad location will sell at a fair price, too. It just won’t be as a high as it would be for a good location.

A home in good condition will sell for a fair price. A home in poor condition will also sell at a fair price. Again, it won’t be as high as a comparable home in better condition.

But neither location or condition will sell any house. Only one thing does that – price.

So if you’re a seller waiting for that “special buyer” who will appreciate your faded pink and black bathroom tile, your vintage orange shag carpet and is willing to help you put your kids through college because of your real estate prowess, you’re going to have a long wait.

So if your home is represented by an agent, and it’s been on the market for a long time, chances are it’s your own fault.

Maybe you didn’t listen to your agent when he said you’re pricing your home above the market. Maybe you got mad at the first few folks who looked at your home and didn’t make offers.

When the showings stopped completely, maybe you accused your agent of not doing a good enough job.

You put the blame on everyone except where it belongs – on you. It’s not about you, what you want, or how much you need for your retirement.

It’s about the price.

Forbes: Nashville a top market to invest in a home for 2014

Scott Harrison
Staff Reporter-Scott Harrison
Staff Reporter-
Nashville Business Journal

In its housing outlook for 2014, Forbes has ranked the Nashville metropolitan statistical area as the fourth-best U.S. market in which to buy a home next year, noting a growing local economy and housing prices that are still under-valued despite a recent uptick.
For its list, Forbes joined with Local Market Monitor and ranked the best housing markets based on high population and job growth, home prices and the local economy.

The average home price in Greater Nashville is estimated at $199,506 — which is 16 percent less than the market’s actual value, according to Local Market Monitor’s “equilibrium home price” measure.

Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, Tenn.
Pop.: 1,582,264
Actual Home Price: $199,506
Equilibrium Home Price: $238,411
Difference: -16%
3-year Growth Forecast: 23%

Five Design Elements Buyers are Choosing

2013 Real Estate Review | Dec 5, 2013 | By: Angela Colley |
New home construction has seen consistent growth in the last three years and sales of new homes are expected to increase by about 16 percent, or 580,000 homes, in 2014, according to Kiplinger’s Economic Outlooks. And as more homes are built, new architecture trends will begin to appear — slowly.

“Building is not an industry where big changes happen really fast,” said Amy Albert, editor of Custom Home Online. ”Things happen over time.”

Still, Albert named five home-design elements she expects to see more often in 2014:

1. Tranquility

More homeowners are seeing their homes as a place to get away from it all and relax, especially in certain rooms — particularly the bathroom. “The spa bathroom is really big as a result of more people traveling to nice hotels,” Albert said. In 2014, we’re likely to see bathrooms with walk-in showers, roomy bathtubs and tranquil designs become a big trend for homeowners.

2. Mission Control

In the past the kitchen was often built at the back of the house, attached to the garage, and away from high traffic areas, but that tradition is changing. In 2014 we’ll see the kitchen as the focal point of the house, often placed in the center of an open floor plan, especially as more homeowners start to use their kitchen space as a multitasking room, or as Albert calls it, “mission control.” By having the kitchen centered and open, parents can help children with homework, talk or pay bills — all while making meals.

3. Traditional Design

While “midcentury modern design is thriving” and will continue to do so in 2014, more homeowners are looking at traditional home styles, Albert said. For example, Craftsman homes with large porches, front columns and detailed gables will make a comeback in 2014. Queen Anne-style homes with asymmetrical facades and detailed gables may also see a resurgence. However, attention to detail will be important as homeowners look for exact replicas of the original styles.

4. Passive Homes

More U.S.-based architects are expected to include passive-house elements in their 2014 designs. Originally a European design, a passive house is built to work with the climate. For example, its roof may be pitched to make use of wind power, or it could have large windows installed to attract sunlight that heats the home. A passive-house design can slash energy consumption by up to 90 percent, according to Passive House Institute U.S.

5. Flex Rooms

Between the recession and the growing number of senior citizens in the United States, more households are becoming multigenerational. That change is leading to a developing trend in home building – flex rooms. Typically bedrooms, flex rooms are designed to give more privacy to larger families and usually include a separate space such as a reading area or study off the main bedroom area. These rooms may also be built with a change in mind. “Many flex spaces include a private entrance, which could later become a rental unit,” Albert said.

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Olive & Sinclair Move to New Location

Olive & Sinclair Move to New Location | Nashville News

Popular and local Nashville chocolatier Olive & Sinclair will open doors to its new retail and factory space in East Nashville today!

This new location, located at 1628 Fatherland St. in East Nashville, will provide guests the opportunity to catch a glimpse of the ‘behind the scenes’ of the local business.

The company loves to include vintage decor and items to their retail shops, including vintage chocolate decor. The space will also include memorabilia and special samples. At today’s soft opening, guests can sip on their special Mexican-style hot chocolate.

Still to come, the shop will launch a new product called chocuterie, consisting of “chocolate salami, pates, our own version of rillettes, all made out of chocolate,” according to the shop owner Scott Witherow.

While factory tours are still yet to come, the shop is now often to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

For more information, visit the website at www.oliveandsinclair.com.

20 Awesome U.S. Cities You Need To Visit In Your 20s

The capital of Tennessee pretty much has it all — gorgeous green space (the Metro Board of Parks and Recreation manages 10,200 acres of land, including 99 parks), urban culture, collegians, and great food. Nashville was named the best city for live music by the Atlantic Cities, making it worthy of its nickname, “Music City”. Beyond just being home to the Grand Ole Opry and the Country Music Hall of Fame, the city is known for its jazz scene, music clubs and record stores along Music Row. East Nashville has become a hot spot for the trendy — dare we say “hipster” — sets.

Happy Holiday Handhelds Top 5 Apps For Stress-Free Merrymaking

Want to make this year’s holiday season the most enjoyable and relaxed one on record? From tracking your spending to hosting a holiday party to keeping the kids entertained at Grandma’s, making your life easier requires looking no further than these handy holiday apps.

Food 52. Food 52 Party planning just got easier for iPhone users. Armed with recipes, tutorials, and event-planning tips and tricks of experts, this “Entertaining Handbook” helps you plan for Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year’s, Valentine’s Day, Passover, Easter and more.

Pickie Gifts. pickie GiftsWracking your bran to come up with the perfect gift for someone? Help is on the way with Pickie’s algorithm-based gift ideas culled from your friends’ Facebook Likes and other Facebook activity. Early reviews say the gift suggestions are right on the money.

Postage am. Postagram. Takes your favorite photos from Facebook, Instagram, phone, or computer and transforms them into actual postcards, then snail-mails them to family and friends! Need we say more?

Flightcaster. FlightcasterPredicts flight delays by analyzing ten years of flight data combined with real-time information up to six hours before the airline announces the delay. For iPhone and Blackberry devices.

FarFaria. FarFariaWith over 500 children’s books in the queue, and new books added each week, FarFaria is the premier story time app for kids ages four and up. Features include offline access to books, an audio “Read To Me” option where any book is read aloud by a storyteller, plus songs, games, personalized libraries for each child, and much more for a monthly subscription of $3.99.

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NASHVILLE – 5 Things to do in Nashvillee

Five things you can only find in Nashville:

1. A full-size reproduction of the Greek Parthenon
Nashville was known as the Athens of the South. In 1897 for Tennessee’s Centennial Exposition, city fathers built a full-scale replica of the real Athens’ most famous landmark. Originally made of plaster, wood and brick, Nashville’s Parthenon wasn’t meant to be permanent. But because it cost too much to demolish, Nashville decided, “What the heck, let’s just rebuild it with real marble floors.”

2. A cinnamon roll that makes international headlines

In 1996, an employee at Bongo Java, a popular Nashville coffee shop, noticed, right before he was about to bite into it, that one of its signature homemade buns bore an uncanny resemblance to Mother Teresa.
The real Mother Teresa got wind of the “Immaculate Confection” and even though she reportedly laughed about it, her people sent a cease and desist order. The owner changed its name to “The Nun Bun”.
Although copyright law was probably on owner Bob Bernstein’s side, the power on Mother Teresa’s side convinced him and his $250-an-hour lawyer to change its name to “The Nun Bun.”
The renamed cinnamon roll was quickly dispatched to a glass-enclosed case in the front of the store, but in 2005, thieves broke in on Christmas, making off with the famed confection.

3. An art festival that revolves around the tomato

This costume-friendly art festival is an annual undertaking in historic East Nashville’s Five Points District.
It has become one of Nashville’s premiere hipster events. It features Bloody Mary taste-offs, tomato bobbing, tomato beauty pageants and wet burrito competitions.

4. Songwriting doctors and insurance agents

Musicians from all occupations sing in Nashville. At Parlor Productions on Music Row in a restored bungalow once owned by Randy Travis, even the nonmusically inclined write songs at corporate team building events put on by Ultimate Event Nashville.

5. A city tour in Milk of Magnesia pink bus

The Jugg Sisters — aka Sheri Lynn Bucy and Brenda Kay Wilkins — are the big-hair, blue eyeshadow and spandex behind the wackiest tour in Nashville.
Nash Trash, their 90-minute comedy tour, rides past many of the city’s country music’s institutions. Tickets sell out months in advance to people hankering to get one of 32 seats on the sisters’ trash-talking, dirt-dishing, yeehaw-yelling tours.