Seller Mistakes

Data provided by ActiveRain.com.

ActiveRain is an online community of real estate professionals who exchange best practices, write real estate blogs, and get free education from the industry and their peers.

The biggest seller mistake is overpricing their home. Regardless of the comparables, their home is “Better”. So it sits on the market until it has to be reduced. Then buyers start asking, “What’s wrong with that house”. READ THE COMPS!

Recently, one of my buyers walked away from purchasing a home because the seller refused to do any repairs. HELLO …..negotiate the repairs!

All of the items on this chart are important….Sellers take note!

IT’S THE PRICE THAT SELLS A HOME

Location affects the value of a home, but it’s price that sells a home.

Oceanfront, mountainside, or penthouse, the most desirable location in the world won’t sell at the wrong price.

Every property has a potential buyer, but like rock, paper, scissors, it’s sometimes hard to know which factor is going to win the showdown.

A good location will sell at a fair price. A bad location will sell at a fair price, too. It just won’t be as a high as it would be for a good location.

A home in good condition will sell for a fair price. A home in poor condition will also sell at a fair price. Again, it won’t be as high as a comparable home in better condition.

But neither location or condition will sell any house. Only one thing does that – price.

So if you’re a seller waiting for that “special buyer” who will appreciate your faded pink and black bathroom tile, your vintage orange shag carpet and is willing to help you put your kids through college because of your real estate prowess, you’re going to have a long wait.

So if your home is represented by an agent, and it’s been on the market for a long time, chances are it’s your own fault.

Maybe you didn’t listen to your agent when he said you’re pricing your home above the market. Maybe you got mad at the first few folks who looked at your home and didn’t make offers.

When the showings stopped completely, maybe you accused your agent of not doing a good enough job.

You put the blame on everyone except where it belongs – on you. It’s not about you, what you want, or how much you need for your retirement.

It’s about the price.

Five Design Elements Buyers are Choosing

2013 Real Estate Review | Dec 5, 2013 | By: Angela Colley |
New home construction has seen consistent growth in the last three years and sales of new homes are expected to increase by about 16 percent, or 580,000 homes, in 2014, according to Kiplinger’s Economic Outlooks. And as more homes are built, new architecture trends will begin to appear — slowly.

“Building is not an industry where big changes happen really fast,” said Amy Albert, editor of Custom Home Online. ”Things happen over time.”

Still, Albert named five home-design elements she expects to see more often in 2014:

1. Tranquility

More homeowners are seeing their homes as a place to get away from it all and relax, especially in certain rooms — particularly the bathroom. “The spa bathroom is really big as a result of more people traveling to nice hotels,” Albert said. In 2014, we’re likely to see bathrooms with walk-in showers, roomy bathtubs and tranquil designs become a big trend for homeowners.

2. Mission Control

In the past the kitchen was often built at the back of the house, attached to the garage, and away from high traffic areas, but that tradition is changing. In 2014 we’ll see the kitchen as the focal point of the house, often placed in the center of an open floor plan, especially as more homeowners start to use their kitchen space as a multitasking room, or as Albert calls it, “mission control.” By having the kitchen centered and open, parents can help children with homework, talk or pay bills — all while making meals.

3. Traditional Design

While “midcentury modern design is thriving” and will continue to do so in 2014, more homeowners are looking at traditional home styles, Albert said. For example, Craftsman homes with large porches, front columns and detailed gables will make a comeback in 2014. Queen Anne-style homes with asymmetrical facades and detailed gables may also see a resurgence. However, attention to detail will be important as homeowners look for exact replicas of the original styles.

4. Passive Homes

More U.S.-based architects are expected to include passive-house elements in their 2014 designs. Originally a European design, a passive house is built to work with the climate. For example, its roof may be pitched to make use of wind power, or it could have large windows installed to attract sunlight that heats the home. A passive-house design can slash energy consumption by up to 90 percent, according to Passive House Institute U.S.

5. Flex Rooms

Between the recession and the growing number of senior citizens in the United States, more households are becoming multigenerational. That change is leading to a developing trend in home building – flex rooms. Typically bedrooms, flex rooms are designed to give more privacy to larger families and usually include a separate space such as a reading area or study off the main bedroom area. These rooms may also be built with a change in mind. “Many flex spaces include a private entrance, which could later become a rental unit,” Albert said.

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Autumn Leaves in Green Hills

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Green Hills is one of the Nashville’s more affluent areas, often chosen by residents who don’t wish a long commute to downtown businesses and three area universities – Vanderbilt, Belmont and Lipscomb Universities (all of which are within a 5-minute drive).
Green Hills is also the home to The Mall at Green Hills, a high-end enclosed shopping center which began as a “strip center” (one of the first two sizable such developments in Nashville) in the early 1950s. Nordstrom and the Apple Store are some of the more recent additions to the mall. Hillsboro Village, with its many interesting shops, is only 3 minutes away.

The Bluebird Cafe, a famous live music venue, is located on Hillsboro Road in Green Hills. Hillsboro High School, located directly across the highway from the Mall, actually predates much of the neighborhood, which began on a small scale in the 1930s but was not highly populated until after World War II. Another public educational institution is Julia Green Elementary School, a primary school. A major private educational institution is Lipscomb University and its associated elementary and high schools. Another is Harpeth Hall School, a prestigious girls’ high school.

Green Hills is in many ways a typical development of its era. It consist primarily of brick-veneer “ranch” style detached houses on large lots In more recent years there has been considerable “infill” as many of the larger lots and other remaining open spaces have been redivided to become the sites of higher-density developments.

Green Hills is one of the Nashville’s more affluent areas, often chosen by residents who don’t wish a long commute to downtown businesses and three area universities – Vanderbilt, Belmont and Lipscomb Universities (all of which are within a 5-minute drive).

Green Hills is also the home to The Mall at Green Hills, a high-end enclosed shopping center which began as a “strip center” (one of the first two sizable such developments in Nashville) in the early 1950s. Nordstrom and the Apple Store are some of the more recent additions to the mall.

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Pumpkinfest Save the date for Saturday, October 26

Historic Downtown Franklin is gearing up for its 30th Annual Pumpkinfest, one of the town’s favorite traditions on and around Main Street on Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013. The free festival, presented by Bank of America, is in full swing from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and festivities will include live music, children’s activities, a Franklin Tomorrow chili cook-off, a costume contest and more to highlight the fall season.

Pumpkinfest activities include:

More than 75 arts and crafts booths will feature handcrafted fall and holiday items. Booths will be set up from the Public Square and East Main Street to First Avenue from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday.
Children’s activities on Third Avenue North will include pumpkin painting, free games with small prizes offered by several local non-profits, inflatables, games and more.
Returning this year is the Great Pumpkin, delivered to Main Street by Franklin’s Sister City—Carleton Place, Canada. The fun will last from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, with some free activities.
Entrance to the festival is free and open to the public.
Live music, anyone? Two stages will offer continuous entertainment from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Main Street and Fifth Avenue, and on the Public Square.
The annual Franklin Tomorrow Chili Cook-off will feature at least 10 teams, who will serve up to two-ounce portions of chili per person. An $8 ticket includes 10 samples from local chefs! The tent is at Third Avenue South, between City Hall and the Courthouse, and they’ll be serving from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Children can compete in four categories during the annual costume contest on the Public Square. The categories are: pets; children, ages 0-5; 6-13; and 14+. The entry fee is $2, and sign-up is next to the stage in front of City Hall, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is a maximum of 50 contestants in each category. Contestants must be entered and present on the Public Square by 3 p.m. to participate.
For some spooky fun, tours of downtown Franklin’s two historic cemeteries on North Margin Street (two blocks from Main Street) will be offered from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday evening. In “Grave Matters: Stories Behind the Stones,” costumed actors relay fascinating stories of the cemeteries’ inhabitants. Tickets are $15 for ages 14 and up, and $5 for ages 7 to 13. Tickets may be purchased at www.franklinonfoot.com, at the Heritage Foundation office at 134 Second Ave. N., or at the gate the night of the event.

Now in its 30th year, the annual fall event is produced by the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County and its division, the Downtown Franklin Association. Pumpkinfest is presented by Bank of America, Waste Management, the City of Franklin, Williamson Medical Center, Publix Super Markets, Fox 17, Williamson A.M./The Tennessean, Clear Channel Radio and Williamson Medical Center.

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Delightfully Frightful Halloween Decor on a DIY Budget

Decorating your home for Halloween doesn’t have to be scary (unless, of course, you want it to be).

Some home owners go all out in a manner more often reserved for Christmas. David Gugel, for instance, takes Halloween decor to stop-and-gape levels. It’s no surprise to learn that he once designed retail window displays for Disney. About.com featured before-and-after photos of his otherwise typical suburban home transformed into a wild October frightfest. If you’re like us, there’s never enough time to pursue all the wild home styles that people create.

For those of us with less dramatic homes, budgets and taste, a little sweat equity can still bring a delightfully eerie air to your abode. Herewith, some relatively simple do-it-yourself ways to capture the spooky season.

Front Yard

Pumpkins and mums add a classic seasonal touch with minimal effort. They can welcome guests at the foot of a driveway, line a walkway to the front door or gather around a tree. The tree itself could sport eyes, cut from felt and held aloft with environmentally friendly adhesives. The truly ambitious could carve Styrofoam headstones, but the faint-of-heart, beware — that’s a half-day project.

Front Door

Classy or ghastly? The options run amok. Amazon sells bloody footprints on paper, but why not make your own? A roll of kids’ mural paper from any craft store, some red acrylic paint, a bit of soap for those dirty feet afterward, and before you can say “wrap the body in a rug,” there are telltale prints leading to your door.

Or stick with simple. Hang a witch’s hat on the front door as you would a wreath. Sit the kids down with scissors, black felt and a stencil, and create a colony of bats. Paint Chinese paper lanterns like jack-o’-lanterns and hang them from the eaves — no scooping innards or tossing rotting (gourd) flesh.

Living Room

Tossing a sheet with eyeholes over a kid’s head and calling them a ghost may be a cliched holiday cop-out, but the same idea can feel almost fresh on furniture. White sheets covering the furniture can lend an air of mystery to a room, as guests (or inhabitants) ponder what goes on underneath. And don’t underestimate the power of low light. If your circuits are on dimmers, you’re ahead of the game, but even candlelight or a well-placed dim bulb can throw unexpectedly fun shadows.

Fireplace

Burn the evidence — but not all of it. Dirt piled where the logs go can host fake bones peeking through. Perhaps there’s mulch left from summer planting? Put it to good use. While it is possible to make your own plaster bone molds, $20 on eBay goes far, too. If you don’t dig dirt, a handful of red glass votives in the fireplace can add a ghoulish air.

Dining Room

For a creeptastic look, think red and black. Yard-sale candlesticks, the more dented the better, covered in high-gloss black spray paint can hold red candles. They’ll give off an eerie glow atop a red tablecloth. Sprinkle plastic bugs around the plates and drape gauze or cheesecloth between the candles and across the table. Watch your guests shudder.

Bonus Bucket

One tip for the frugal: Start thinking about next year now. Come Nov. 1, if not earlier, stores will deeply discount their Halloween offerings. Even if you don’t have the time or funds to spruce up the house this year, some judicious shopping could get you all set for 2014.

If the monsters haven’t gotten you yet, we flipped over some the home styles bursting with gourds and color pictured here — the looks can transfer to any home, even on a smaller scale. But if you want to go big, you have company. Don’t even bother counting the skeletons — of course, there are 13.
By Anne Miller, Realtor.com

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FOR BUYERS: HOW TO FIND A REAL ESTATE AGENT WHO HAS YOUR BEST INTEREST AT HEART

Before starting your home buying journey, it is always a good idea to find an agent who has your best interest at heart. As an Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®), my business is helping buyers every step of the way. Also, as a member of the National Association of Realtors® I believe in, and follow a strict code of ethics that let me best serve you in your home search. If you have any questions, please contact me. I look forward to working with you.

Buyer’s Agent

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HOME DECORATING & REMODELING SHOW

September 6, 7, 8, 2013

The largest and finest home show in Tennessee! A 3-day upscale consumer show where you can talk with hundreds of experts in design, decorating & remodeling. Buy direct, save thousands and take advantage of all the great deals and discounts found only at this show! Free Seminars Daily!

– See more at: http://www.nashvillelifestyles.com/events/home-decorating–remodeling-show-26213#sthash.PAR9Ftyq.dpuf

Nashville Home Show

Patio Perfection

This outdoor paradise would be the perfect place to relax on a warm summer night; wouldn’t you ‘like’ to kick your feet up here? As your local agent, I can make your home dreams like this a reality!

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Hiring a Home Builder?

When hiring a homebuilder, you need to ensure you pick someone with the right professional experience for your needs. There are many homebuilders to choose from, and it can be challenging selecting one with the ability to offer quality construction services. Here are 5 things you should consider before hiring a homebuilder.

1. Level of Experience

A potential builder must have several years of experience constructing homes similar to the one you want. Experience something that cannot be replaced.. Recent homes built by a contractor in consideration should feature the latest design and technology. The buildings should also meet all the applicable building codes. A lot can be said for a builder who has proven the quality of their services over the years.

2. External Relationships

The quality of a builder’s relationships with suppliers, engineers, architects and town planners is a key. Contractors who have excellent working relations with architects and interior design professionals are preferable, because it shows their ability to communicate and manage relationships. Another great benefit of external relationships is pricing. Builders who work with preferred providers may be able to obtain raw materials at a discounted price, reducing your overhead cost.

3. Ability to Offer Customized Solutions

When building a new home, you want to ensure everything is perfect. How flexible and accommodating will your potential builder be? Can they interpret your needs and turn them into reality? Customization of your home includes everything from doors, windows, lighting controls, entertainment systems and more. It’s the smallest details that make a house into your home. Make sure your builder feels the same way.

4. Time of Delivery

A reputable company should have a fixed period of time in which they will to complete your home. They should be able to provide you with a budget of the total costs and a timetable of all the projects with completion dates.

5. Do they feel right?

Finally and most importantly, is this someone you can work with for an extended period of time? This is an important question because it enables you gauge the overall ability of the contractor to meet your expectations. They need to have machinery, well-trained, experienced staff, and the finances necessary to complete your new home. Building a home is no small task, it may be one of the most important things you ever do. Above all else, make sure whomever you pick as your builder shows drive and commitment to constructing a quality home, efficiently and within budget.

About the Author
Post curtesy of Meggie Haneckow, guest blogger. Meggie loves travelling and blogging. The rest of the time, she loves to write about various topics. She is currently working for Home builders Cincinnati.

– See more at: http://www.zippyshell.com/moving-storage-blog/building-a-new-home#sthash.u5DLUWCa.dpuf