4th of July is special to me.

On my way to Florida to celebrate my youngest sons 4th of July birthday.
I’m so proud of his accomplishments and just love, love, love him. He’s had a tough time in his early years but struggled through to obtain a bachelors degree. Plus he has a great career in the medical field.

There are many festivities in Franklin and Nashville this weekend.

Franklin On The 4TH

NEWS UPDATE:

2016 “Franklin on the Fourth” in Downtown Franklin
The annual Independence Day celebration begins at 10 a.m. on July 4th.

Franklin, Tennessee – This year’s 4th of July Celebration will focus on family fun and include great music, quality crafts, tasty food, antique cars, and a large kids zone. Downtown Franklin is the perfect location to have a festival and community event such as “Franklin on the Fourth”.

The free festival kicks off at 10 a.m. on Monday, July 4th, with bluegrass music playing from the stage. Food vendors include everything from roasted corn on the cob to BBQ, ice cream to nachos; and corn dogs to smoothies. Craft vendors will fill the area with wood working, jewelry and other handmade items.

Our presenting sponsors, Kroger and Williamson Medical Center, will have booths right on the Square. Antique cars will line Main Street between the square and 4th Avenue. The kid’s zone on 3rd Avenue North will have inflatables, a petting zoo, and pony rides. The always fun Children’s Parade begins lining up at 4:45 and starts at 5 p.m. Registration for the parade is free and goes on all day at the Lions Club booth, which also will be selling water.

Live entertainment, including popular groups Mersi Stone, Tommy Jackson’s Rocky Top Revue, Williamson Branch, Adam Searan, and John England and the Western Swingers , continues throughout the day with a variety of music genres including Bluegrass, Country, Soul, Patriotic Music, and Big Band Swing. The final group of the day will be the 129th Army Band, “Guardians of Swing”, preceded by the presentation of colors and the “National Anthem”

Franklin on the Fourth ends at 8 p.m. to give attendees time to get to the Fireworks Display at the Park at Harlinsdale Farm. The display, put on by the City of Franklin and its sponsors, will begin at approximately 9 p.m.

“Franklin on the Fourth” is coordinated by the Franklin Lions Club and TN Events in conjunction with the City of Franklin. All proceeds benefit the Franklin Lions Club Charities.

REMEMBER !!
The tradition of the “Children’s Parade” will continue and begin at 5:00 p.m. (Children will begin lining up at a designated marked location at 4:45) There will be Prizes for best costume and decorated bikes and wagons. Pets are welcome!

10:00 a.m.
Festival Begins
Marty Crum Bluegrass
Vendor Booths and Kids Zone are Open!!

11:15 a.m.
Mersi Stone

12:05 p.m.
Williamson Branch

1:05 p.m.
Tommy Jackson’s Rocky Top Revue

2:00 p.m.
John England and the Western Swingers

3:10 p.m.
Adam Searan

4:15 p.m.
The Fabulous Suede’s

4:45 p.m.
Line up for the Children’s Parade Begins

5:00 p.m.
Children’s Parade Begins

5:15 p.m.
Speeches, Recognitions
National Anthem

5:30 p.m.
“Dixie Strutters”

7:00 p.m.
Presentation of Colors
National Anthem
The 129th Army Band
“Guardians of Swing”

What makes Nashville a place people want to live?

I read a stat that Nashville grows by 80 people a day. Of all the stats I read on a daily basis, this one stuck with me—Chicago only grew by 82 people in all of last year!

The Nashville region is expected to grow by almost 40 percent over the next 15 years, adding roughly 500,000 people. Cranes are everywhere in Nashville, and with few reliable transit options, so are cars.

So what makes Nashville a place people want to live?

I went to Nashville, talked to local leaders, dined in its hip new restaurants, ate delicious popsicles and spent lots of time in Uber to find out what makes Nashville so great.

The first thing I noticed about Nashville was cranes. They are everywhere. More than 100 new projects—$2 billion in development—are being constructed in Nashville. I counted six in a few-block area of the Gulch neighborhood, adjacent to downtown Nashville and Music Row, alone. The second most noticeable thing about Nashville? Cars. There are almost no transportation options other than driving.

Overall my research points to seven reasons Nashville has nbecome so popular, but also cautions that sustainability is a real concern and could stymie future growth.

Reasons Nashville is growing
1. Low cost of living
2. Families
3. Less stress
4. Jobs
5. Government efficiency
6. Planning
7. Culture

Issues it must address: Transportation and Affordable Housing

What makes Nashville an attractive place?

1. Low cost of living
A cost of living comparison offers the first glimpse of why Nashville is an attractive option for people. Housing is less expensive in Nashville. Add to that the fact that annual expenses for a family of four are roughly $15,000 cheaper. And Tennessee’s per capita taxes are some of the lowest in the country. With no state income tax, combined state and local per capita tax burden is only $2,777 in Tennessee.

2. It’s good for families
Between 2009 and 2014 Nashville grew by 41,000 people or about 17,000 households.

3. Stress—less of it

Also on par with the low cost of living that makes Nashville an attractive place is a few phrases that kept coming up in my conversations—Nashville “is easy” or “simple” and “a less stressful place to live.” In a comparison of the most stressed-out cities, Nashville is 33rd. While sitting at Barista Parlor Golden Sound, a coffee house located in an old recording studio in the Gulch neighborhood, I overheard a conversation that sums up that sentiment. A woman in her 20’s was visiting from New York City and talking on the phone about a potential move to Nashville. Her reason? I can work anywhere, why am I killing myself trying to pay rent in NYC when there are cool things in Nashville and it’s so much cheaper? She went on to say “I don’t have a desire to leave New York, I have a desire to not have a heart attack by the time I’m 30.” And the clincher: “I have another friend moving here from San Francisco and can rent a beautiful one-bedroom loft overlooking downtown Nashville and be less stressed.”

4. Jobs
Named one of Gallop’s top five cities for job growth, over the past decade Nashville grew nine times more jobs than Chicago as a percent of total jobs. Taxes and the regulatory environment could play a role in that growth—Tennessee’s corporate income tax rate is 6.5 percent, compared to Illinois’ combined 9.5 percent. Tennessee’s business tax climate is ranked 15th. There’s also no personal income tax.

5. Government Efficiency
With no state income tax, combined state and local per capita tax burden is only $2,777 in Tennessee compared to $4,658 in Illinois.

A universal theme I heard attributed to Nashville’s growth is that the city “removes hurdles to make it happen.” One of these hurdles is layers of government. Businesses have said they located in Nashville because there were less layers of government to deal with in the region and, whether or not the reality, Nashville was perceived as an easier place to do business. For example, a call center was awarded a building permit in one day.

The city of Nashville and Davidson County have one, consolidated government, Metro. Assessment of that shift found the consolidated government did improve efficiency and slowed down the increase in government expenditures per capita, suggesting that the metropolitan government was doing more with its resources. Surveys of residents found that people were very satisfied with the consolidation.

6. Planning

Nashville’s Belmont neighborhood: A Nashville Next plan goal is to make Nashville more walkable and less car dependent.

Nashville recently adopted Nashville Next, a comprehensive plan that will guide the city’s growth for the next 25 years. Adopted on June 22, 2015, after three years of community engagement involving more than 18,500 participants, The plan is “…a strategy for what the city should do. Where to build homes — and what kind. How to improve transportation. And the best ways to spend city tax dollars.” There is an overall consensus on focused development downtown. The plan’s four strategies are:

1. Create more walkable centers
2. Create opportunity through abundant housing
3. Build a high-capacity transit system and
4. Increase the community’s resiliency

In creating the four strategies, planners considered changes in demographic trends, poverty and environment, and aligned those trends with the plan’s goals. For example, Nashville will have an older population with the aging of the Baby Boomer generation and a younger Millennial generation, both of whom will want smaller, attached homes rather than homes on large single-family lots. Further, demographic trends “…point toward a future where demand for walkable neighborhoods outstrips the supply…”

Nashville Next has a preferred future shaped by six factors:

1. Protection of sensitive environmental features
2. A complete transit network
3. Household affordability across income levels
4. Focus on activity centers—places with transportation access, abundant housing and amenities
5. Strategic infill that supports transit lines and activity centers
6. Protection and enhancement of the character of different parts of the county. The plan goals include:

Develop standards that guide the design, location and construction of affordable housing across all neighborhoods.
Target infill development along mobility corridors to provide more housing choices that support walking and transit use and to transition gracefully between residential neighborhoods and more intense mixed use and commercial centers and corridors.
Ensure jobs, education and training opportunities are located close to transit service, in centers or in high-need areas.

Development in Nashville’s Gulch neighborhood.

These goals will guide how the Metro government regulates land use, zoning and other development decisions as well as capital spending through policy maps. The policy maps give geographic guidance for decision-making, such as priorities for transit or new greenways. Progress will be tracked annually.

7. Culture

Nashville has many of those amenities for a mid-size city. Its restaurant scene is, “…growing exponentially” and a new $623 million downtown convention center complex “…is demonstrating that the center of gravity is now moving downtown.” Nashville has Tennessee Preforming Arts Center featuring many Broadway shows, Opera, Museums and MUSIC!

And this may be anecdotal, but more than one person (and many Uber drivers) told me that Nashville’s growth is due to the TV show Nashville, Taylor Swift making country music more mainstream and Jack White.

By Chrissy Mancini Nichols
October 21, 2015
Metroplanning.org

10 Signs You’re From Franklin, TN

Outsiders should visit at least once in their life.
By Jenna Beaudin in The List on Apr 25, 2016

Franklin, Tennessee is not your everyday small town. Growing up there my whole life until I moved away for college is truly a blessing, and I wouldn’t have wanted to grow up anywhere else. With Nashville’s popularity on the rise, people shouldn’t forget about the beautiful town only 30 minutes southwest of the big city. If you’re from Franklin, I hope you agree that these are some things that only we will understand.

1. Always being tempted to explore the red caboose.

2. Knowing you’ll be late to school because of the one lane traffic, even when it’s a late start.

3. Going to Nashville on Saturday night and walking on Broadway only to laugh at the drunk people walking around.

4. Trying to be a hipster at Frothy Monkey.

5. When your only options to go out on the weekends are the mall, going to the movies, or walking around Downtown Franklin.

6. Scaring your friend with the “DTF?” text when really it means “Downtown Franklin?”

7. Getting to brag that Miley Cyrus basically grew up there and shows it off to her famous friends.

8. ….and that she loves our town so much she filmed that scene from the Hannah Montana Movie in our high school.

9. When we all thought the end of the world was upon us when the flood hit in 2010. (This is a grass field beside my house by the way)

10. When you’re visiting family from college and the night before you go back, you eat your feelings because college will never be Franklin.

I never appreciated how wonderful Franklin was until I left for college. Every time I go back, I cherish every moment. If you’re a senior graduating this year, go outside and breathe in that beautiful, clean, Franklin air, because college air is just not the same.

Jenna Beaudin
www.theodysseyonline.com

52 Places to visit in Nashville, TN by Huffington Post

There’s a reason that Nashville has been named one of the 52 places to go in 2014 by the New York Times.

Nashville is, increasingly, the perfect blend of its historic country roots and its hipster and rock & roll present. It’s a strange juxtaposition, certainly, that the land of Elvis and Dolly is now also the land of hipsters and foodies, but that’s how it goes, it seems.

With that in mind, here are 22 reasons why you visit the blended old and new Music City not just this year but right now.

1. The hot chicken (a Nashville specialty) at Hattie B’s. Add a side of pimento mac & cheese.

2. The piano at Studio B (an additional tour at kinda-gotta-see The Country Music Hall of Fame), where Elvis recorded more music than anywhere else.

3. With over 700 of them, there are more churches per capita in this town than any place else in the country. So there’s that.

4. Little Richard lives on the top floor of the Hilton Hotel downtown, across from the Country Music Hall of Fame. It’s a known fact. And so lovable.

5. Hatch Show Print. An oldie–established in 1879–but a goodie for lovers of letterpress posters.

6. Honky tonks! Robert’s Western sits amongst a plethora of options on lower Broadway.

7. Frist Museum for the Norman Rockwell show (on through Feb. 9).

8. The awesome blue grass tunes at The Station Inn.

9. The guacamole and house margarita at Saint Anejo in the Gulch, one of the hipster neighborhoods that just popped out of nowhere.

10. The full scale replica of the Parthenon.

11. Shopping at Nashvillian boutiques in places like Hillsboro Village (home of the famous Pancake Pantry) and 12 South (Below, 12South Tap Room, seen on warmer days).

12. The burgers at Burger Up (be prepared to wait in line).

13. Franklin, a 20-minute drive south of town, for shopping and good eats.

14. Goo Goo clusters!

15. The beauty of the Ryman Auditorium, the “mother Church of country music.”

16. The knowledge that the band you’re listening to at some random venue might just be the next big thing.

17. Parnassus Books, an independent store owned by author Ann Patchett.

18. The complete package experience of Pinewood Social: brunch, bowling and booze.

19. People are really friendly.

20. The ridiculous amounts of memorabilia at the new-ish Johnny Cash Museum.

21. Knowing that you could run into Taylor Swift at any moment.

22. Jack White’s Third Man Records store.

Franklin TN real estate: Brentwood TN real estate

Franklin TN real estateFranklin TN real estate and Brentwood TN real estateBrentwood TN real estate residential sales were the best on record since July 2005.

Homes for sale in Franklin TNhomes for sale in Franklin TN tops the charts in the Monthly Market Stats.

The number of single-family residential closings increased by 32.1% in July 2013 compared to July 2012.

The median sales price for a single- family home was $350,000 in July of 2012 with an increase to $385,500 in July of 2013.

Closings Res. 538 Condo 27

Med. Price Res. $385,500 Condo $192,000

Avg. Price Res. $447,076 Condo. $207,329

DOM Res. 68. Condo. 70

The number of single-family residential closings increased by 32.1% in July 2013 compared to July 2012.

The median sales price for a single- family home was $350,000 in July of 2012 with an increase to $385,500 in July of 2013.

Days on the market decreased from July 2012 compared to July 2013.

Media reports quick sales and a lack of necessary inventory across the country. Williamson County’s real estate market is experiencing many of these same effects on our market as consumer confidence in housing grows in both Franklin TN homes for saleFranklin TN homes for sale and Brentwood TN homes for saleBrentwood TN homes for sale.

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Davidson County School Calendar 2013-2014

8/1 All students report for half-day
8/2 Teachers report for in-service; student do not report
8/5 Grades 1-12 report for full day; half day for PK and K
9/2 Labor Day Holiday
9/4 Progress reports issued
10/4 1st quarter ends
10/7 Teacher planning day; students do not report
10/8-10/11 Intersession
10/14-1018 Fall Break; students do not report
10/21 2nd quarter begins 10/28 Report cards issued
11/1 Parent-teacher conference day; students do not report
11/20 Progress reports issued
11/27-11/29 Thanksgiving Holidays
12/17-12-20 Half day for exams grades 9-12
12/20 Half day for all students; end of 2nd quarter & 1st semester
12/23-1/3 Winter Holidays
1/6 Teacher planning day; students do not report
1/7 3rd quarter begins; all students report
1/13 Report cards issued
1/20 MLK Holiday
2/12 Progress reports issued
2/17 Professional development day; students do not report
3/14 3rd quarter ends
3/17 Teacher planning day; students do not report 3/18-3/21 Intersession
3/24-3/28 Spring break
3/31 4th quarter begins 4/7 Report cards issued
4/18 Spring Holiday
4/23 Progress reports issued 4/30-5/7 TCAP testing
5/26 Memorial Day Holiday
5/27-5/29 Half day for exams grades 9-12
5/30 Half day for all students; end of school year
6/2 Teachers report for in-service; last day for teachers 6/9 Last day for assistant principals

Six days are built into this calendar for inclement weather

Bluebird Cafe, Nashville, TN

The Bluebird Café is one of the world’s preeminent listening rooms and the venue has gained worldwide recognition as a songwriter’s performance space where the “heroes behind the hits” perform their own songs; songs that have been recorded by chart-topping artists in all genres of music. The 100 seat venue is unassuming in appearance but some of the most significant songwriters and artists have performed on this stage.
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At The Bluebird, performers include up-and-coming songwriters along with those whose music is regularly on the charts, country music as well as pop, rock and Contemporary Christian hits. Kathy Mattea was the first star to be identified with The Bluebird. Garth Brooks played on both our Open Mic and Sunday Songwriter’s Shows before he was discovered and signed to Capitol Records.

A typical nightly performance consists of three or four songwriters seated in the center of the room, taking turns playing their songs and accompanying each other instrumentally and with harmony vocals. It is an experience that few forget, and one that reflects why Nashville is known as Music City. YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT COUNTRY MUSIC STAR MAY APPEAR!
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On October 10, 2012 The Bluebird Cafe made its primetime debut on the ABC drama Nashville. The Bluebird Cafe is a key factor in the show’s plotline which deals with both the music industry in Nashville, the political climate in Nashville and the key players in both these “worlds,” which often collide. Nashville the city is also showcased in the beautiful cinematography of the show each week.

The Bluebird has received much press attention throughout its 30 years; from live interviews with Barbara Walters and Katie Couric to our recent story in Southwest Spirit magazine. (http://www.spiritmag.com/2008_06/features/ft3.php)
In any given week, we have film crews, national photographers and celebrity visits http://blogs.nashvillescene.com/nashvillecream/but it is always the music that people remember and the songs that keep Bluebird devotees “sssshhhushed.”

Bluebird Cafe Hours of Operation
Monday-Thursday: 5:00 -11:30
Friday-Sunday: 5:00 – 12:00

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4th of July

As Americans, we need to reconnect to our heritage As Americans, we need to reconnect to our heritage, channel the wisdom of the Founding Fathers, and rediscover the meaning behind our country’s creation. And we need to do it every year.

The point of observing the Fourth of July: To help us remember why this country was founded, and to help us transmit that collective memory to the next generation.

Before America was a nation, it was a dream – a dream shared by many people, from many nations, over many generations. In this new world, where you came from didn’t matter; what mattered was where you were headed.

As more and more people settled, they started to see themselves as new people – Americans.

They felt blessed: The land was spacious. The opportunities limitless.

FREEDOM

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDANCE

HAPPY BIRTHDAY AMERICA

Today, 4th of July, 2013, in the Nashville area ALL activities were cancelled due to storms.

Happy Birthday to my son, Grant….born on the 4th of July!

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Woman Cave -The New Trend

It’s popular to give men their own “man cave”, so they have a place to call their own in their home.

I think the man cave was created to keep the man out of the woman’s hair. Let him watch his sports with his buddies or play poker with his friends, etc.

Well, the times are changing. The new trend is the “woman cave”!

In Franklin, TN, my friend created her own “woman cave.” She wanted an area for entertaining, particularly for grilling and parties. She finished

  • her garage with paint (the beams are a different shade) sealed the concrete floor and added a wall of cabinets. She finished with a beautiful counter top and a refrigerator was added too.

    Her place, her style and we’re having lots of parties!

    I would love to hear your ideas too.

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    Governors Club

    The Governors Club is a gated community featuring custom designed homes surrounded by an award winning private Arnold Palmer golf course. As the premier private golf club community in Middle tennessee, this exclusive neighborhood is an ideal luxury community. Located in Williamson County, it is only a few minutes from downtown Nashville or Cool Springs/Franklin.

    The Governors Club golf course is a private 18-hole course highlighted by magnificent stone and rock work. Each demanding hole grabs your attention due to meandering creeks, waterfalls and dramatic elevation changes.

    Home prices range from the $600,000 to over $2,000,000. There are 438 homesites with a few lots still available. Three gated entrances, pool, children’s pool, clubhouse and fitness center makes living easy.

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